Authors

 

Authors

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Fraser
Jeannette Montgomery

Kathleen Fraser’s work has most recently focused on three artist books: ii  ss, a text/image work in collaboration with painter Hermine Ford (Granary, forthcoming 2011); S E C O N D Language, collaged text, with images by JoAnn Ugolini (Cloud Marauder, 2009); and WITNESS, with linoleum prints by Nancy Tokar Miller (Chax, 2007). Earlier artist books include boundayr, aquatints by Sam Frances (Lapis, 1987); from a text, wax encaustic paintings by Mary Ann Hayden (1993); W I N G, drawings by David Marshall (Em Press, 1995); Etruscan Pages (bilingual), with drawings by JoAnn Ugolini (Cloud Marauder, 2001); and Fraser’s collaged text, hi  dde  violeth  e  dde  violet (Nomados, 2003). A collection of her poetry and visual texts, m o v a b l e  TYYPE, is forthcoming from Nightboat Books. Other collections include Discrete Categories Forced into Coupling (Apogee, 2004), Translating the Unspeakable: Poetry and the Innovative Necessity, collected essays (University of Alabama, 2000), and il cuore: the heart: Selected Poems 1970-1995 (Wesleyan University, 1970). With Rob Halpern, she recently finished co-editing the selected writings of Frances Jaffer. Fraser taught at San Francisco State University from 1972 to 1992, where she founded and directed the American Poetry Archive. In 1983, she began to publish and edit the journal HOW(ever), together with associate editors Frances Jaffer, Beverly Dahlen and Susan Gevirtz, focusing on innovative writing by contemporary women and “erased” or neglected texts by Anglo/American modernist women writers. Contributing editors included Carolyn Burke and Rachel Blau DuPlessis. After a hiatus of eight years, Fraser initiated the online journal HOW2 with a revolving international editorship of English language poets and scholars. She is winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, two NEA grants, the Frank O’Hara Prize for Poetry and a Visiting Artist’s studio grant at the AAR in Rome.

 

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Robert Glück

Robert Glück is the author of nine books of poetry and fiction, including two novels, Margery Kempe (High Risk, 1994) and Jack the Modernist (Gay Presses of New York, 1985; High Risk, 1995), and a book of stories, Denny Smith (Clear Cut, 2003). Glück edited, along with Camille Roy, Mary Berger, and Gail Scott, the anthology Biting The Error: Writers on Narrative (Coach House, 2005, reissued 2010). Glück was Co-director of Small Press Traffic Literary Arts Center, Director of the Poetry Center at San Francisco State, and Associate Editor at Lapis Press. His poetry and fiction have been published in The New Directions Anthology, City Lights anthologies, Best New Gay Fiction for the years 1988 and 1996, The Norton Anthology of World Literature, Best American Erotica for the years 1996 and 2005, and The Faber Book of Gay Short Fiction. His critical articles appeared in artforum international, Aperture, Poetics Journal, and Nest: A Quarterly of Interiors, and he prefaced Between Life and Death, a book on the paintings of Frank Moore (Twin Palms, 2002). In 2009 he and artist Dean Smith completed the film Aliengnosis. Glück teaches at San Francisco State University.

 

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Barbara Guest
Judy Dater

Born in 1920 in North Carolina, Barbara Guest spent her childhood in Florida and California. After graduating from the University of California at Berkeley, she settled in New York City, where she became connected with the poets and Abstract-Expressionist artists of the New York School, who were to influence her poetry. For several years, she reviewed art for Art News, and continued to write about painting in that magazine and in Art and America. Painting and its allied arts remained a constant in her poetry, particularly through her collaborations with artists. Her numerous books of poetry include The Location of Things(Tibor de Nagy, 1960), Poems (Doubleday, 1962), The Blue Stairs (Corinth, 1968), Moscow Mansions (Viking, 1973),The Countess from Minneapolis (Burning Deck, 1976, reprint 1991), The Türler Losses (Mansfield Book Mart, 1979), Quilts (Vehicle Edition, 1981), Fair Realism (Sun & Moon, 1989, reprint 1995), Defensive Rapture (Sun & Moon, 1993), Selected Poems (Sun & Moon, 1995), Quill, Solitary Apparition (Post-Apollo, 1996), Musicality (a collaboration with artist June Felter, Kelsey Street, 1998), Rocks on a Platter: Notes on Literature (Wesleyan, 1999), The Confetti Trees (Sun & Moon, 1999), Miniatures and Other Poems (Wesleyan, 2002), The Red Gaze (Wesleyan, 2005), and Collected Poems (Wesleyan, 2008). She is also the author of a novel, Seeking Air (Black Sparrow, 1978; Sun & Moon, 1997), a biography of the poet H.D. entitled Herself Defined (Doubleday, 1984; Schaffner, 2003); and two essay collections, Forces of Imagination: Writing on Writing (Kelsey Street, 2003) and Dürer in the Window: Reflexions on Art (Roof, 2003). A festschrift was held at Brown University in her honor in 1993. Her honors include two America Awards for literature from the Contemporary Arts Council, the Lawrence Lipton Prize, the San Francisco State University Poetry Award, and the Frost Medal for Lifetime Achievement by the Poetry Society of America. She died on February 15, 2006 in Berkeley, where she lived with her daughter Hadley during the final years of her life.

 

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Brenda Hillman
Meg Escude

Brenda Hillman has published eight collections of poetry, all from Wesleyan University Press: White Dress (1985), Fortress (1989), Death Tractates (1992), Bright Existence (1993), Loose Sugar (1997), Cascadia (2001), Pieces of Air in the Epic (2005), and Practical Water (2009), for which she won the LA Times Book Award for Poetry, and three chapbooks: Coffee, 3 A.M. (Penumbra Press, 1982); Autumn Sojourn (Em Press, 1995); and The Firecage (a+bend press, 2000). She has edited an edition of Emily Dickinson's poetry for Shambhala Publications (2009), and, with Patricia Dienstfrey, edited The Grand Permisson: New Writings on Poetics and Motherhood (Wesleyan, 2003). She is included in Poets & Writers’ list of 50 of the most inspiring authors in the world, and is the recipient of the 2005 William Carlos Williams Prize for poetry and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation. Hillman is the Olivia Filippi Professor of Poetry at Saint Mary's College in Moraga, California. She is a member of the permanent faculties of Napa Valley Writers' Conference and Squaw Valley Community of Writers. Hillman is involved in nonviolent activism as a member of the Code Pink Working Group in the Bay Area. She is married to poet Robert Hass.

 

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Nathaniel Mackey
Paul Schraub

Nathaniel Mackey is the author of five chapbooks of poetry, Four for Trane (Golemics, 1978), Septet for the End of Time (Boneset, 1983), Outlantish (Chax, 1992), Song of the Andoumboulou: 18-20 (Moving Parts, 1994) and Four for Glenn (Chax, 2002); four books of poetry, Eroding Witness (University of Illinois, 1985), School of Udhra (City Lights, 1993), Whatsaid Serif (City Lights, 1998) and Splay Anthem (New Directions, 2006); and an ongoing prose work, From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate, of which four volumes have been published: Bedouin Hornbook (Callaloo Fiction Series, 1986; second edition: Sun & Moon, 1997), Djbot Baghostus's Run (Sun & Moon, 1993), Atet A.D. (City Lights, 2001) and Bass Cathedral (New Directions, 2008); the first three of these have been published together as From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate: Volumes 1-3 (New Directions, 2010). He is also the author of two books of criticism, Discrepant Engagement: Dissonance, Cross-Culturality, and Experimental Writing (Cambridge University, 1993; paper edition: University of Alabama, 2000) and Paracritical Hinge: Essays, Talks, Notes, Interviews (University of Wisconsin, 2005). Strick: Song of the Andoumboulou 16-25, a compact disc recording of poems read with musical accompaniment (Royal Hartigan, percussion; Hafez Modirzadeh, reeds and flutes), was released in 1995 by Spoken Engine Company. He is editor of the literary magazine Hambone and coeditor, with Art Lange, of the anthology Moment's Notice: Jazz in Poetry and Prose (Coffee House, 1993). His honors include the selection of Eroding Witness for publication in the National Poetry Series, a Whiting Writer’s Award, the National Book Award for Splay Anthem, an Artist’s Grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Roy Harvey Pearce/Archive for New Poetry Prize, the Stephen Henderson Award from the African American Literature and Culture Society, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. In 2001, he was elected to the Board of Chancellors of the Academy of American Poets.

 

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Michael Palmer
Christopher Felver

Michael Palmer is the author of numerous books of poetry, including Company of Moths (New Directions, 2005), which was shortlisted for the Canadian Griffin Poetry Prize; Codes Appearing: Poems 1979-1988 (New Directions, 2001); The Promises of Glass (New Directions, 2000); The Lion Bridge: Selected Poems 1972-1995 (New Directions, 1998); At Passages (New Directions, 1996); Sun (North Point, 1988); First Figure (North Point, 1984); Notes for Echo Lake (North Point, 1981); Without Music (Black Sparrow, 1977); The Circular Gates (Black Sparrow, 1974); and Blake's Newton (Black Sparrow, 1972). He is also the author of a prose work, The Danish Notebook (Avec, 1999) and an essay collection, Active Boundaries: Selected Essays and Talks (New Directions, 2008) and editor of the anthology Code of Signals: Recent Writings in Poetics (North Atlantic, 1983). Palmer has translated work from French, Russian, and Portuguese. He edited and contributed translations to Nothing the Sun Could Not Explain: Twenty Contemporary Brazilian Poets (Sun & Moon, 1997), and Blue Vitriol (Avec, 1994), a collection of poetry by Alexei Parshchikov. He also translated Theory of Tables (1994), a book written by Emmanuel Hocquard after translating Palmer's "Baudelaire Series" into French. He has frequently collaborated with others artists, including the painter Gerhard Richter and the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company. His honors include two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writer’s Award, a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship, and the Shelley Memorial Prize from the Poetry Society of America. In 1999, he was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. He lives in San Francisco.

 

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Stephen Ratcliffe
Peter deJung

Stephen Ratcliffe’s many books of poetry include New York Notes (Tombouctou, 1983), Distance (Avenue B, 1986), [where late the sweet] BIRDS SANG (O Books, 1989), spaces in the light said to be where one/ comes from (Potes & Poets, 1992), Present Tense (The Figures, 1995), Sculpture (Littoral, 1996), SOUND/(system) (Green Integer, 2002), and CONVERSATION (Bootstrap, 2010). He has also published three 474-page books, each written in 474 consecutive days: Portraits & Repetition (Post-Apollo, 2002), REAL (Avenue B, 2007), and CLOUD / RIDGE (ubu editions, 2007); and three 1,000-page books, each written in 1,000 consecutive days: HUMAN / NATURE (ubu editions, 2007), Remarks on Color / Sound, and Temporality (both still unpublished). His 14-hour reading of HUMAN / NATURE at UC Davis on June 8–9, 2008 and another 14-hour reading of Remarks on Color / Sound on May 16, 2010 at Marin Headlands Center for the Arts can both be found at PennSound (http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Ratcliffe.html). He is also the author of three books of literary criticism: Campion: On Song (Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1981), Listening to Reading (SUNY, 2000), and Reading the Unseen: (Offstage) Hamlet (Counterpath, 2010). He has lived in Bolinas, a small town on the coast north of San Francisco, since 1973, and has taught at Mills College in Oakland since 1984.

 

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Elizabeth Robinson
Linnea Lenkus

Elizabeth Robinson is the author of several collections of poetry, most recently The Orphan & Its Relations (Fence, 2008), and Also Known As (Apogee, 2009). A new book of poems, Three Novels, is forthcoming from Omnidawn. Her work has been included in poetry anthologies including American Hybrid (Norton, 2009), The Best of Fence (Fence, 2009), Isn't It Romantic (Wave, 2004), Not for Mothers Only (Fence, 2007), and Joyful Noise (Autumn House, 2006), as well as in essay collections such as The Grand Permission (Wesleyan, 2003) and Radical Vernacular (University of Iowa, 2008). Essays have also recently appeared in books on creative writing pedagogy: Poets on Teaching: A Sourcebook (University of Iowa, 2010), and The Working Poet (Autumn House, 2009). Robinson has been the winner of the Fence Modern Poets Prize, the National Poetry Series, and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Individual Artists Award as well as a grant from the Fund for Poetry. She is a coeditor of EtherDome Chapbooks and Instance Press.

 

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Camille Roy
Merredyth Messer

Camille Roy is a writer and performer of fiction, poetry, and plays. Her book Sherwood Forest, a collection poems and prose, was selected by the FuturePoem 2010 panel for publication in its 2011 series. She edited Biting the Error: Writers Explore Narrative with Mary Burger, Robert Glück, and Gail Scott (Coach House, 2005, reissued 2010). Her books include the play Cheap Speech (Leroy, 2002), a fictional autobiography titled Craquer (Second Story, 2002), and two novellas published together as Swarm (Black Star Series, 1998). Earlier books include a collection of poetry and prose, The Rosy Medallions (Kelsey Street, 1995) and two plays published together as Cold Heaven (O Books, 1993). Her writing has appeared in numerous anthologies including The Book of Practical Pussies (poems with art by Michelle Rollman, Krupskaya/Tender Buttons, 2009), Moving Borders: Three Decades of Innovative Writing by Women (Talisman House, 1998), and The New Fuck You: Adventures in Lesbian Reading (Semiotexte, 1995). In 1998 she was the recipient of a Lannan Writers at Work Residency at Just Buffalo Literary Center. She is a founding editor of the online journal Narrativity. Roy has taught creative writing in multiple genres and forms at several institutions, including San Francisco State University, SummerArts, and Naropa.

 

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Leslie Scalapino
Tom White

Leslie Scalapino’s first book, O and Other Poems, appeared in 1976 and was followed by thirty books of poetry, prose, inter-genre fiction, plays, essays, and collaborations. Recent publications include The Animal is in the World like Water in Water (a collaboration with artist Kiki Smith, Granary, 2010), Floats Horse-Floats or Horse-Flows (Starcherone, 2010), and It’s go in horizontal / Selected Poems 1974-2006 (University of California, 2008). Posthumous works include a book of two plays published in one volume, Flow-Winged Crocodile and A Pair / Actions Are Erased / Appear (Chax, 2010), a new prose work, The Dihedrons Gazelle-Dihredals Zoom (Post-Apollo, 2010), and a revised and expanded collection of her essays and plays, How Phenomena Appear to Unfold (Potes & Poets, 1991; Litmus, 2010). Her long poem way (North Point, 1988) received the Poetry Center Award, the Lawrence Lipton Prize, and the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation. Her plays have been performed in San Francisco at New Langton Arts, the Lab, Venue 9, and Forum; in New York by the Eye and Ear Theater and at Barnard College; and in Los Angeles at Beyond Baroque. Scalapino was the founder and publisher of O Books and the editor of four editions of O anthologies, as well as the periodicals Enough (with Rick London) and War and Peace (with Judith Goldman). Scalapino taught writing at various institutions including Bard College, Mills College, the San Francisco Art Institute, California College of the Arts in San Francisco, San Francisco State University, UC San Diego, and the Naropa Institute. She passed away on May 28, 2010 in Berkeley, California.

 

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Juliana Spahr
Candace Ah Nee

Juliana Spahr is a poet, editor, and literary critic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Truong Tran
Scott Louie

Truong Tran is a poet and visual artist. His publications include The Book of Perceptions (Kearny Street, Workshop, 1999), Placing the Accents (Apogee, 1999), dust and conscience (Apogee 2002; awarded the San Francisco Poetry Center Book Prize), within the margin (Apogee, 2004), and four letter words (Apogee, 2008). He is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including two San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist Grants in poetry, the Arts Council of Silicon Valley Grant, the California Arts Council Grant, the Creative Work Fund Grant, the Fund For Poetry Grant, and most recently the San Francisco Arts Commission Grant in Visual Arts. Truong lives in San Francisco and teaches at SFSU and Mills College, where he is the Visiting Assistant Professor. In February 2010 he launched “The Lost and Found,” his first solo visual art exhibit at the Mina Dresden Gallery in San Francisco. His visual work can be viewed online at http://gnourtnart.com. He will be a featured poet in UC Berkeley’s Lunch Poems reading series in March of 2011.

 

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this is the dialog test text
I’ve always been attracted by the nontraditional in art and by contemporary work that finds meaning—even necessity—in testing the established, pre-approved limits of its medium.
I did not think there was an “I”—a self—that existed apart from representations—texts of one kind or another—but I was urgent to “tell my story,” a completely different kind of truth, the strange story of the marginalized experience of a sexual minority whose existence was rather experimental itself, and had yet to appear in our literary forum.
Each generation [of poets] has a necessity that it has to work out for itself. And the intelligence will only help you so far in that task, and then you have to reside in your imagination.
Our very greatest human thing—which is language to me—musicians would say it’s music, but I think it’s language—our very greatest human thing is wild. Uncontrollable. It is impossible to put boundaries on your words, even if you make a poem.
I’ve heard people who do in poetry something that emulates what Coltrane does. They’ll actually scream, do things of that sort…. My screaming is … the fraying of meanings; it’s the colliding of sounds that creates certain consternations of meaning that might be the counterpart of the scream, analogous to the scream.
I have an ironic relationship to figures of speech as they are in the world, and a fascination with the mystery that occurs as we reframe them. We let them pass as everyday-life words, and yet if we pull back just a step, they acquire a kind of poetic estrangement.
The world out there can’t ever be exactly reenacted. But through working in these repeating forms over a long period of time, I’m exploring how the things of the world can be enacted in language.
I would argue that poetry-making is not a solitary but a communal activity. Part of our ethical work as writers … is to engage with that, to be good readers and responders, to participate in some way.
I am not of the school that one ought to run around trying to have extreme experiences in order to become a more interesting person. I do think, though, that when things go really, really wrong, and people act out violently, it’s in those moments that you see the playability of reality.
I think people being actively aware are jumping out of a propagandized state of social conventions. Writing could be an active state outside social convention. Yet it is not to be alone, not to withdraw, or to fail to pay attention. In that case one couldn’t write, because what would there be to write?
My drive in thinking about writing something is the question, How can I look at this information and re-sort it in a way that helps me to understand it? I’ll think, Oh, gee, I’m really confused about colonialism and my role in it; I’m going to sit down and try to think about some ways that I can gain an understanding of it.
Speaking English was the way that I separated myself from my parents…. Becoming a writer was a way to further separate … especially because in my writing I examine issues such as being gay and being raised Catholic. But … the more I’ve written, the more I’ve circled back to the connections and stories that originated in my family.